TRANSFORMERS Alternative

Physical Appearance Guide:

A guide of how the characters used in TRANSFORMERS Alternative will be portrayed.

Blaster & the Autobot cassettes, as illustrated and colored by Dreamwave's Pat Lee and Gary Yeung.
A sample of the work demonstrated by Pat Lee and Dreamwave Productions.

Author's note: In reading my stories, readers are encouraged to use their imaginations, as if they never knew what the characters look like. However, for those who know about all the familiar characters, some of them may be confused, seeing how visuals of the Transformers have been published in several mediums, in addition to the detailed artwork printed on the majority of their toy packaging. This leaves some people with a "how would really they look" state of confusion. My own outlook is to find the most physically appealing and easy to imagine forms of each character. When I feel like drawing them myself (again), they will follow this format.

While some of the characters will look no different from their cartoon personas, some may look better using the toy's "box art", or the toy itself as a medium. To the best of my ability, I listed the forms that I've made complete decisions on. As for any others, use more of your imagination until a decision is made.

Here are my perceptions on how each style of art appears.

Box Art - The box art is a commercial artist representation as to how the figures would look in real life. However, the art style tends to change from year to year, depending upon the subject.

Cartoon - Sunbow/Marvel Productions - The look presented in the cartoon is closest to 1979 Gundam artwork. Very few details are captured, making them easy to draw. This process also allows the characters to be made to look more "humanoid". The 1984 Decepticon planes' legs are lengthened to look like more than "hip joints". Some of the faces covered by masks, are made to move or are removed altogether in order to show speech. However, in 1985, Attempts were made to make the characters have more of a 1984 box art style, meaning more features were added to the "humanoid" forms, while making some elements look ungainly or squat. Characters such as Inferno and the 1985 planes are hindered by this style. Movie characters (who were actually concepted in late 1984) use a merging of the minimalist style with a new style, making them look far more humanoid than toymakers of the time could match. Some combining characters introduced in 1986 seldom look like their toy counterparts (i.e. Swindle, Breakdown, etc.), giving suspicion to the notion that they were drawn based on concepts before a finished product was given to artists as a reference. Later characters use a cross between minimalist techniques and external detailing. Characters such as Scattershot have all of his ungainly features, but none of his "unnecessary" decals are used. However, colors used closely match the toy's color scheme.
Movie - Sunbow/Marvel Productions/DeLaurentiis Entertainment Group - Transformers: The Movie was produced in the same fashion as the cartoon series, but benefitted from better graphic art, particularly due to the fact that more time was spent on it (2 years). Characters who look simplistic in the main show look impressive in the movie. Starscream, Blurr, and Ultra Magnus are the principal examples of this argument.
Original Comic - Marvel - Most of the Marvel artwork involving the Transformers originates from the same profile sheets as the cartoon. (Since Marvel is responsible for both the American cartoon and the comics, this comes as no surprise.) The Marvel comic uses more originality in the first 2 and final 30 or so issues of the book, due to the fact that no cartoon episodes (excluding commercials) feature characters after 1987. In those and other instances, like mainline comic books, the individual artist is responsible for how the characters look, based on a single profile sheet, or color chart. While the Autobot (small) Headmasters carry more of a "cartoon" look in their earliest appearances, they look less... square-faced in later appearances. Issue #68, penciled by Dwayne Turner, has the most unique look. However, I personally was ... unnerved by that work. It was like taking a Lv. 4 Frieza punch to the gut while being strangled by his tail in mid-air. (Keep in mind most humans have power levels in the single digits...)
TF: Generation 2 Comic - Marvel - The G2 Comic takes figures from G1 comics and completely changes them. While some characters resemble their toy counterparts, others have solid portions of their bodies, such as necks or combiners chest dockings, changed to thick sections of cables. This looks neither relistic, nor believable, due to the lack of sturdiness in such a machine. Otherwise it piles the artists' poor imagination onto the minimalism carried by the Marvel Transformers. Another interesting note is that characters were sometimes seen carrying loads of weapons -- commando-style -- with their main weapons looking nothing like the ones they are used to carrying.
TF: Generation 1 Comic - Pat Lee and Dreamwave Productions - Dreamwave's work for the Transformers almost speaks for itself. Like comparing original Mobile Suit Gundam to any of the 1990s Gundam programs, this work stands out like a General Lee in a used car lot. The details are crisp, decals are made important to the robots' design, and the eyes have an "alive but mechanical" look that keeps you drawn to them. While this series is not perfect, it definately looks like a step in the right direction. Dreamwave's other Transformers titles & works are also drawn in this style.
Transformers: Infiltration and Stormbringer Comics - IDW Productions - After Dreamwave's unfortunate bankruptcy caused Hasbro to seek a new Transformers comic licensee, IDW took the reigns, producing all-new Transformers stories. While some of the Dreamwave Transformers artists made the transition, the new series features Generation 1 characters re-imagined as if they came to life in the 2000s, transforming into more modern vehicles (such as Prowl being a 350Z, Ironhide and Ratchet as 2000s-era Ford vans, and the Battlechargers as 2002 Camaroes). Only Wheeljack and Bumblebee appear in their original vehicle modes, with Bumblebee's robot mode resembling Super GoBot Bug Bite. Jetfire resembles the Transformers Classics version (or perhaps vice versa).

TRANSFORMERS Alternative
Physical Appearances

AUTOBOTS

Blaster - Blaster has 2 sets of box art, not including that of his Japanese rebuild, Twincast. The pre-TF MicroChange art (not in his TF colors) possibly looks better than his true box art. He has a seperate look from his cartoon self, and his Marvel Comics version (after issues #17 & 18). While the original comic version is a hardcore version of his toy form, I think I best prefer the Blaster shown on TF: Generation 1's issue #5, Autobot cover. For TF: Alternative, try to picture that version in a 50-50 mix with the cartoon version. Throw in toy-based "decaled features" and you've got yourself a smooth communicator.
Bluestreak - I am stuck with a 50-50 preference for his original box art and the Japanese "anime" re-issue's box art. While it does retain his show-accurate colors (familiar to most who bought toy Bluestreaks), I don't like the change in decals (and license plates), nor the red eyes. The representation in Dan Khanna's 1984 Autobot Groupshot seems to be a great middle ground. Lastly, I think the Datsuns (Prowl & Smokescreen included) should have a common appearance as a base, similar to the 2 trios of Decepticon planes.
Bumblebee - Bumblebee's cartoon look is usually preferred over his original box art. (Aside from being gold, I love his G2 box art.) The cartoon look, in tandem with the cartoon-inspired Pat Lee look, is my personal choice. However, I think the MicroChange-exclusive circuit detailing (seen in the original box art) should remain above his symbol.
Camshaft - Aside from looking taller, Camshaft will take most of his cues from his "mail-order sheet artwork". While he will have humanoid detailing, I'm undecided as to where. The thighs are a possibility.
Cliffjumper - Like Bumblebee, people (including me) prefer Cliffjumper's cartoon appearance. I also love Pat Lee's take on the character, using taillights on his shoulders that look like they belong to a Porsche 924.
Downshift - While taking numerous cues from his "box art" and toy forms, Downshift will be mainly a custom effort. Picture him with humanoid looking thighs and light blue eyes. (The Omnibots' had no box art, as they came in cardstock mailing boxes. However, they do have artwork on mail-in sheets.)
Eject & Rewind - Great as toys with bad artwork overall... until 2002. Pat Lee does these two proud, but with the "chrome details" based on the actual toy's color scheme. Their faces should look like they are 2 different colors (orange and orangish-red). Their guns look better in gold than silver.
Grapple - Like a number of the other 1985 Autobot cars, Grapple also possesses great box art. In truck mode, (and possibly robot as well,) I want to see an Autobot symbol in the same location it's always in, but with a few exceptions. First, no background frame (the silver of the decal) should be seen. Secondly, underneath the symbol should be the "FUSO" lettering, making it seem as if the Autobot symbol is inconspicuous in place of the Mitsubishi "tri-diamond" one.
Hoist - Hoist's box art looks better than anything else I've seen of him.
Inferno - Like Hoist, Inferno has some of the best box art in the 1985 set. This confirms that he was built as an early part of Diaclone CarRobots collection. The box art practically said all that needed to be said. However, the Pat Lee version drawn on Transformers: Generation 1 issue #6 is great second, despite the minor color flaws. I recently found out that Grapple and Inferno had a Mitsubishi-Fuso logo molded onto their front grills (the red/orange portion) before Hasbro got to them. In truck mode, (and possibly robot as well,) I want to see an Autobot symbol in the same location it's always in, but with a few exceptions. First, no background frame (the silver of the decal) should be seen. Like with the red cartoon Autobots, Inferno should have a very thin silver or yellow outline surrounding each piece. Secondly, underneath the symbol should be the "FUSO" lettering, making it seem as if the Autobot symbol is inconspicuous in place of the Mitsubishi "tri-diamond" one.
Ironhide - The cartoon and Marvel Comics' Ironhide essentially use the same sketch, but differ by colors. I prefer the cartoon colors. At some point, I may write a story using the toy form bodies, in addition to the tracked platforms used by both Ironhide and Ratchet. If so, colors should be toy-based. IDW cover art produced by Guido Guidi based on the 1984 versions of Ironhide and Ratchet make the most use of details from the toy (minus tracked transport) while still making the figure based on details from the cartoon versions.
Jazz - To me Jazz has one of the coolest box arts of 1984 group. The only thing coming close would be his cartoon persona. (We shall miss Scatman Crothers.) If there were a way to take his box art, give it sky blue eyes/visor, and make his legs look more like a fluid transformation (as opposed to bulky like the toy), then that would be the Jazz I'd want. In car mode, his features as a Porsche 935 Turbo would be enhanced. The Martini logos would have correct spelling, he'd have the correct striped pattern, his head and tail lights would be prominently noticed, and so on. However, the front "triangle" windows which can't be represented on the toy would also be noticeable.
Jetfire - To me, Jetfire should look like a Macross VF-1S, Super Valkyrie. To this end, I like his box art, coupled with Dan Khanna's variation of the same. However, it would be neat to see Skyfire's face underneath the VF-1S's "masked" head, with his (red) eyes exposed.
Minerva - Minerva is the transformer most Americans think of as "Nightbeat's female half". In addition to sounding like a Ranma joke in poor taste (poor kid would've been better off as a dinner salad), it also fights the fact that Nightbeat and Minerva have separate box art and cartoon/comic art. For Minerva, I prefer her cartoon/anime art, as seen in Transformers: Super God Masterforce, due to the fact that it gives her a feminine look the 1988 toy design was unable to complete. However, to combat the continued minimalism used in the Japanese series, her toy-accurate detailing (including "decals") and colors should be used to fill in some gaps. It would also help if her car mode looked more realistic, given the Porsche 959 is such a prominent car. [Writer's note: The American "Powermaster" name replaces the Japanese "Godmaster", suggesting that "power" may be used in place of "god", given the right context. Therefore I may refer to Japanese based terms in the American context, such as Super Jinrai's partner Powerbomber. Anyway, Super Power Masterforce sounds better IMHO.]
Nightbeat - Nightbeat suffers from the problem of trying to make him look as male as possible in order to fight his female Japanese origin. While I like his box art, I prefer the comic-used chest plate and the subtle (comic) modifications to his head. If nothing else, the visor should stay. (Upon further research, I've come to learn that the features from Nightbeat's head and helmet come from the toy version of Siren's head and helmet.)
Optimus Prime (Convoy) - There's no one like the original Optimus Prime. However, so many different versions of him have been drawn that I still can't decide which medium to use.
Optimus Prime - Powermaster & Jinrai - Famous as the first "new version" of Optimus Prime, with his visage carrying into both the Marvel Comic(s) and the TF: Masterforce series, Prime has seen a lot of coverage in a short amount of time. This version of Optimus (or Super Jinrai to Japanese fans) should use a combination of features from their shared box art, the US comic and Japanese cartoon. With the box art as the driving force, the truck-trailer super robot should have blue eyes, indigo hands and a slight modification on the head to resemble Optimus/Convoy more. The grill should look relistic (as compared to a 1970s Frieghtliner C.O.E. truck). The small robot (Jinrai, truck cab) should combine features between the movie form of Optimus with the Japanese concept art for the anime version of Convoy. Finally, features of the toy should be thrown in to round the two versions out (such as smokestacks like those of 1984-1985 Optimus on the inside of the shoulder). The 2 rifles should have different features, like the comic book. The first should look like Optimus/Convoy's laser rifle, slightly modified. The second one should look like it does in the box art/toy. The first is refered to as a laser rifle (again), the second by its Japanese name, the Electromotive Rifle. The laser rifle should look as large as its counterpart. As for the truck form, make him look like the perfect cross between the US comic version and the actual (Super Jinrai) toy. On HiQ/Jinrai: I love the American representation of HiQ used in Transformers #50, and the TF Universe entry in Transformers #70, but prefer to merge that with the chrome-engined Jinrai. His form as Prime's engine block will look like the one shown in TF: Masterforce. For the record, Optimus will be able to merge with Godbomber.
Overdrive - Overdrive will acquire the same "human touches" as Downshift. Picture the toy/box art version with a taller appearance, muscular (human) thighs, hips, face (beneath his visor), and torso (not including his front fenders, "hood", and roof.). Like Jazz, his visor be light blue.
Powerdasher - Powerdasher's many forms would be best managed with a 1985 cartoon style, including his decals. (However, I still haven't decided to use him.)
Prowl - Although I mainly prefer his box art version, I love how the TF: Generation 1 covers show all of his toy details with a pair of toy-accurate launchers, and correctly colored taillights. However, I don't like the inclusion of the rubsign (a blight to most 1984 TFs) or window frames on his doors. (Truthfully, I don't think the 280-ZX had a window frame on the door, but I could be wrong.)
Ratchet - Cartoon and Marvel Comics Ratchet essentially use the same sketch, but differ by colors. Use your own preference when referring to this form. At some point, I may write a story using the toy form bodies, in addition to the tracked platforms used by both Ironhide and Ratchet. If so, colors should be toy-based. IDW cover art produced by Guido Guidi based on the 1984 versions of Ironhide and Ratchet make the most use of details from the toy (minus tracked transport) while still making the figure based on details from the cartoon versions. However, IDW's Ratchets use color schemes based on the Marvel comic version.
Red Alert - Red Alert has great box art. To this end, I'm stuck with a 55-45 mixture of it and Pat Lee's Red, seen on TF: Generation 1 #6, Autobot cover. My own vision of Red Alert should still have the cartoon-based red head with blue eyes.
Sideswipe - Pat Lee does his favorite TF proud in the newest TF comic books. However, I would prefer if he drew Sideswipe's own decals on him as opposed to Red Alert's.
Skids - A great robot with a bad vehicle mode. Should be faithful to his great box art.
Skyfire - Skyfire is best known as Hasbro & Marvel's "lawsuit buster". Squarish in every way possible, Skyfire can be best described as VF-1 parts cut up, and glued together again in a form impossible to transform. However, this hodgepodge looks great in the way he's presented. Even though fans knew Jetfire was a much better product, We still loved seeing Skyfire. Since TF: Alternative writes Jetfire and Skyfire as two different characters, they will look like two different characters. Skyfire will retain his cartoon look, period.
Smokescreen - 50-50 mix of his own box art with Diaclone's "Fairlady Z Racing Type" box art. In car mode, he will carry the majority of the real Devindorf 280 ZX-R's sponsorship decals. [Update] Recently, I bought the TF: Collection #5 re-issue of Smokescreen. The box art from this, which I suspect also came from Pat Lee and/or Dreamwave Productions is the best artwork I've seen of this character since his box art(s).
Sunstreaker - Pat Lee does yet another great job on the other brother. His color scheme should be somewhat more "toy accurate", if possible.
Topspin & Twin Twist - 3 words -- Correct box art. Like Topspin, Twin Twist will also have blue eyes. The tail fins removed from the Diaclone version of Topspin will be used. Should Topspin's "D-A-R" stripes be used? No. Do they look good on the toy? Yes.
Tracks - We know and love the 1978 Corvette that turns into the vain Tracks. Even in robot mode he looks as good as he thinks he does. However, his best look is the one presented by his box art. However, I'd merge this with the red (exposed) face used by his cartoon persona. [Update] Recently, I bought the TF: Collection #4 re-issue of Tracks. The Box Art for this re-issue merges the features I mentioned above perfectly. However, it leaves out the rounded inner leg countours the original Diaclone/TF box art makes look so good...
Ultra Magnus - 50-50 mix of his box art and the Movie version. Unlike the cartoon, the 2 squares making out his windshield cutouts in the movie look translucent. Eyes and chest shield are light blue.
Wheeljack - Wheeljack's box art sets the standard. Not the cartoon/Marvel comic, Pat Lee's version, nor anyone else's truly compares. (except possibly Dan Khanna's, but then he's mostly recreating the box art look.) My P.O.V.: Box art with faded green tinted windshields and wings, red rims, Dan Khanna/cartoon/Pat Lee based exposed blue eyes (and "Alitalla" respelled "Alitalia"). A number of real Alitalia Stratos #539 details would be included into the car mode, which in turn modifies the look of the roof mounted "wing". (The wing looks like a "hump" on the roof in toy form.) The blinking "ears" effect should also be retained.
Windcharger - Dan Khanna's "1984 Autobot Groupshot" has the most appealing version of Windcharger I've seen. It puts all other versions so far to shame. Although I could invision a Windcharger that transforms like the cartoon version (with the front wheels being behind the shoulder/front fender), I don't quite have the engineering skills to see it through (yet).

DECEPTICONS

Cyclonus - His movie-based form and color scheme sets the standard.
Dirge - I think it's safe to say that we liked the "coneheads"' cartoon forms because they were most like the toy. Given the fact that the box art for them suffers from 1985's less... alive style or painting, in addition to the fact that decals from 1984's jets are illustrated, you can see why the cartoon wins out. My P.O.V.: Cartoon form (maybe with framed cockpit), with correct decals (in correct colors), engine detailaing from Pat Lee version, and a small bit of the box art for realism. Cartoonish red eyes.
Galvatron - His movie-based form and color scheme sets the standard.
Insecticons (Kickback, Bombshell, & Shrapnel) - The Insecticons have excellent box art, most likely painted originally for the Diaclone line, as so many 1984 Autobots were. Pat Lee's Insecticon cover for TF: Generation 1 #3 was equally eye-pleasing. Starting from either (although I have a 60-40 preference for the box art), all 3 should have red eyes/visors. Kickback could possibly have red eyes under his shaded visor. The insect forms used in the 1985 "back-of-box art" capture their true essence.
Laserbeak & Buzzsaw - All of the Decepticon cassettes have great box art (except Rumble). The condors are a great example of this. However, like the actual toy, their flat wing edges and equally flat beak don't make them look very flight-worthy. The cartoon/Marvel comic heads and wings compensate for this. However, the wings should still maintain the same exposed circuitry look as their box art, with the colored panels on the inside and outside of the wing having the same pattern, but looking like it's right against a clear plexiglass cover. A panel with a Decepticon symbol would cover the center sections.
Megatron - Megatron has a practical toy form, but the norm is to make him look as little like the actual toy as possible. To this end, there are several variants to Megatron. The earliest comic version (in addition to the 1984 rear-of-box mural) show him with a black 2-layered "helmet" and a hand-held version of the fusion cannon that resembles Soundwave's extended concussion cannon (without the missile). The cartoon version pretty much sets a standard, one which later comic versions follow. The Pat Lee version also mimics and alters the same standard. "The standard" features an off-white body (as opposed to silvery chrome), red eyes, a smaller "framed brow" than the toy, and minimalist circuitry details. My P.O.V.: 50% cartoon Megatron, 50% Pat Lee Megatron.
Octane - Octane has great box art, which I can't say the same for the cartoon version. At least the color scheme matches the toy/box art. Speaking of which, I don't know anyone who owns an Octane with chrome arms, but I like the lower halves that way. In short, think of the box art with a darker and cooler (bluish) shade of purple on his stripes and cartoon-esque red eyes.
Ramjet - I think it's safe to say that we liked the "coneheads"' cartoon forms because they were most like the toy. Given the fact that the box art for them suffers from 1985's less... alive style or painting, in addition to the fact that decals from 1984's jets are illustrated, you can see why the cartoon wins out. My P.O.V.: Cartoon form (maybe with framed cockpit), with correct decals (in correct colors), engine detailaing from Pat Lee version, and a small bit of the box art for realism. Cartoonish red eyes.
Ravage - With "box art" like his, can you truly argue with it? Only if you were a fan of the cartoon. With their limited color palette, they create another interesting take on this missile-loaded jaguar. With the color scheme closer to the actual toy/cartoon one, and cartoon-inspired label placement (not to mention looking slightly more... 3-dimensional, touch-ups on the box art would make this form a standard.
Rumble and Frenzy - Pat Lee does these two proud. However, they should have red eyes, and Decepticon insignias placed over the "vents" below their circuit pattern. What color should their bodies be? The cartoon made Rumble blue and indigo, and Frenzy red and black, while the actual toys and Marvel comics were the exact opposite. While my stories re-align the cartoon continuity, you choose the colors that work for you.
Scourge - His movie-based form and color scheme sets a standard. However, a few of the colors used for emphasis don't necessarily work. For example, his beard should be a lighter shade of gray, although not quite as light as his face. His fingers shouldn't be partially gray with red ends (polished nails?), although it wouldn't be quite as bad to have his whole hands be gray.
Shockwave - A number of the 1985 Transformers suffer from poor quality box art. Shockwave is no exception. While having his arm stretched out to indicate his electronic "powers" seems like a good idea, the artwork is painted with the gun arm on the wrong side and he looks bulky, with skinny legs. (With the toy, this is true.) Marvel used their own talents to spread his leg width out more and with issues #4-6, slowly work on making him seem "normal". (I guess they're used to working with "cyclops"es. :D ) Of Shockwave's many appearances in the book's run, Shockwave looks best on the cover of issue #5 (great painting!) and in #6, when Megatron blew him out of Mount St. Hillary. Most people would prefer to not see him in such an odd P.O.V., so I stick with TF #5's cover. From the cartoon, I love the way his eye blinks when he talks.
Skywarp - While it is true that Skywarp essentially shares the same cartoon/comic(s)/toy frame as Starscream, his demeanor is unique, not to mention the character's detailing. Therefore, he should be 35% box art, 35% cartoon, and 30% Dan Khanna (or Pat Lee). The paramount concerns are that his "decals", toy color scheme, red eyes, silver face, tail fins & wings, and proper wing stripes are maintained.
Soundwave - I've heard that Soundwave (not Soundblaster) has a different pose than the box art one we're used to. I love his box art (but wish they bothered to recolor Rumble's tape form to Buzzsaw's colors). However, the red eyes and shoulder battery missiles of the cartoon are hard to pass up. Pat Lee's Soundwave is great, but the color and design inconsistency from picture to picture make it a tough to use as an example.
Starscream - Nearly any Transformers fan is familiar with Starscream's form as seen in the cartoon series and movie. However, the box art captures his figure much better, as well as including the tail rudders and wings. Pat Lee's Starscream provides a neutral ground to this and more, including the toy's golden eyes and an answer to where Starscream's jet engines relocate to. My own view of Starscream is: 40% box art, 30% cartoon, and 30% Pat Lee (OR Dan Khanna), with cartoon-based red eyes.
The Sweeps Refer to Scourge. In buying "Sweeps" for my personal TF collection, my plan is to complement a early 1986 Scourge I acquired (which has a painted blue surface) with 2-4 "poster" Scourges. (The later models all have decaled blue surfaces.) The same could be done on paper. Otherwise, they should continue to look alike.
Thrust - I think it's safe to say that we liked the "coneheads"' cartoon forms because they were most like the toy. Given the fact that the box art for them suffers from 1985's less... alive style or painting, in addition to the fact that decals from 1984's jets are illustrated, you can see why the cartoon wins out. My P.O.V.: Cartoon form (maybe with framed cockpit), with correct decals (in correct colors), engine detailaing from Pat Lee version, and a small bit of the box art for realism. Cartoonish golden yellow eyes.
Thundercracker - While it is true that Thundercracker essentially shares the same cartoon/comic(s)/toy frame as Starscream, his demeanor is unique, not to mention the character's detailing. Therefore, he should be 40% box art, 35% cartoon, and 25% Pat Lee or Dan Khanna. The paramount concerns are that his toy-based "decals", cartoon color scheme, red eyes, silver face, tail fins & wings, and proper wing stripes are maintained.

Now that you understand the story behind TRANSFORMERS Alternative #0, you should better understand the story behind 6 of my new characters, the Uncanny Omnibots. (NOTE: Downshift leads, not Overdrive.) the other two are Bianca Accipitrid(ae), who shall soon become the Maximal Talondres, and Desert Thunder, a sandstorm-creating bounty hunter who will work for anyone and sell out his family so long as cuts a big profit. Enjoy the segments that I've written already!

                                                James Jackson (II)


The artwork above is the property of Dreamwave Productions, the comics studio responsible for the Transformers: Generation 1, Transformers: Armada, and Transformers: The War Within comics.
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